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Comparative International Law$
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Anthea Roberts, Paul B. Stephan, Pierre-Hugues Verdier, and Mila Versteeg

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190697570

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190697570.001.0001

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International Law in Chinese Courts during the Rise of China

International Law in Chinese Courts during the Rise of China

Chapter:
(p.295) 14 International Law in Chinese Courts during the Rise of China
Source:
Comparative International Law
Author(s):

Congyan Cai

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190697570.003.0014

This chapter highlights a different set of elements that become manifest in assessing the rapid overall rise in references to, and application of, international law by courts in China in recent years. This chapter seeks to theorize Chinese judicial policy toward international law, without discussing this policy’s legitimacy. The core argument is that China’s 30-year pursuit of great power status has been a significant causal and explanatory factor in the particularities of approach, methodology, and structure in judicial application of international law by Chinese courts. Section II presents and discusses the Chinese legal system’s pathways for giving effect to international law. Section III reviews Chinese courts’ sensitivity to differences among the various categories of relationships governed by specific international rules, and explores their connection with, and implications for, the economic and geopolitical rise of China.

Keywords:   international law, Chinese courts, rise of China, Chinese judicial policy, Chinese legal system

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